LGBT+ creative writing workshop 28th June

Tying in with the #50years events this year, Derbyshire LGBT+ are pleased to announce the Rainbow Writers Project, a series of free creative writing workshops for LGBT+ people. A local published writer will help participants explore creative writing through a series of fun exercises, suitable for all levels. There will be time to write, discuss and read out during each workshop.

There will be a workshop open to all LGBT+ people on Wednesday 28th June 6-8pm at our centre.  If you would like to book a free place, please get in touch with us on mailto:info@derbyshirelgbt.org.uk.

LGBT+ History: Scotland’s decriminalisation/ first UK AIDS case

1980 Sex between two men over the age of 21 ‘in private’ is decriminalised in Scotland.  Homosexual activities were legalised in Scotland  — on the same basis as that which was used for the 1967 Act in England and Wales — by Section 80 of the Criminal Justice Scotland Act 1980.

80 Homosexual offences

—(i) Subject to the provisions of this section, a homosexual act in private shall not be an offence provided that the parties consent thereto and have attained the age of twenty-one years.

(2)An act which would otherwise be treated for the purposes of this Act as being done in private shall not be so treated if done—

(a)when more than two persons take part or are present or

(b)in a lavatory to which the public have, or are permitted to have, access whether on payment or otherwise

1981 The first UK case of AIDS was recorded when a 49-year-old man was admitted to Brompton Hospital in London suffering from PCP (Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia). He died ten days later. He had lost weight over three months and suffered three weeks’ general malaise and progressive breathlessness.

The first concerns were raised in the US as described in the following extract from a CDC report;

A review of requests for pentamidine had documented that PCP in the United States was almost exclusively limited to patients with cancer or other conditions or treatments known to be associated with severe immunosuppression (3). Recent requests for this drug from physicians in New York and California to treat PCP in patients with no known cause of immunodeficiency had sparked the attention of Division staff.

An article from 1981 speculates about the causes of what would become the AIDS epidemic.

“Dr Jaffe,[said] the epidemic may be due to a new and previously unrecognised strain of an infectious agent – possibly comparable with Legionnaires’ disease. This agent may or may not be a virus. He added: “We have no evidence at the moment that it is transmitted from person to person, but this is something we are concerned about.” In recent months, British specialists have become increasingly interested in US developments, and current speculation in medical circles is about when, rather than whether, further PCP and the first KS cases will turn up here. “We have to be careful not to be alarmist,” a London doctor closely involved said last week. “The numbers we are talking about are very small. But I think this problem is going to become a large one.”

http://briandeer.com/aids-1981-uk.htm

Training session for volunteers interested in delving into LGBT+ history!

As part of Derbyshire LGBT’s history project “Other Stories”, we’ll be joining forces with Record Office in Matlock on 27 May to discover what resources and materials they have available that can help us uncover stories from LGBT+ history. Staff from the record office will talk attendees through the materials available and how they can be accessed, with a particular focus on LGBT+ relevant sources. Those attending will also be able to view the display on LGBT history on show at the Record Office until the end of the month. Full details:

Saturday 27 May, 10am-1pm – Derbyshire Record Office, New Street, Matlock DE4 3FE. Limited parking is available on site and there are a number of blue-badge spaces in the car park adjacent to the record office.

Attendees will be asked to sign-up as project volunteers before attending and will have the opportunity to learn skills that can help our project find more previously hidden stories from our community’s past.

Email heritage@derbyshirelgbt.org.uk for more details and to sign-up.

 We will be announcing further training sessions like these throughout the project and in other locations around the county. This will include training on recording oral history interviews, so even if you can’t make these events, please get in touch by emailing heritage@derbyshirelgbt.org.uk if you’re interested in attending in future. Find out more about the history project by following the project on social media @LGBT_heritage / facebook.com/lgbtheritage or looking at our blog otherstorieslgbt.wordpress.com:

 

LGB-QWERTY returns!

LGB-QWERTY returns this Friday evening with a night at the Guildhall in Derby.  We are proud to present an entertainment night like no other, a partnership event between ourselves, Furthest from the Sea and Twisted Tounges.  As part of our #50 years events, we will be using this event to look at what LGBT+ life and experiences were like before and around 1967.  The first of our three QWERTY’s this year, this one will be on the theme of ‘Looking Back’ and there will be commissioned poets and spoken word performers from around the area who have created new pieces to have their inaugural performances on the night.  Come along to hear these brand new works, after which there will be open mic slots in the second half.

Tickets available on the door, doors open 7pm, performance starts 7.30pm. All donations and monies from the evening will be split between ourselves and the LGBT+ support service in Chechnya.

IDAHOBIT 2017

Despite today’s rain, there was a good turn out at the Derby Council Offices for the ceremony and raising of the rainbow flag.  We were saddened that PCC Hardyal Dhindsa was unable to be in attendance and mark the occasion, but Derby Mayoress Linda Winter raised the flag, and Gordon Sterling, Director of Strategic Services and Transformation at Derby City Council gave a speech on the history and the importance of the event, highlighting current difficulties that LGBT+ people face around the world.  This was followed by our very own Greg Pickup talking about the work of Derbyshire LGBT+ and our Hidden Histories archives project before everyone shared a beautiful cake and had refreshments.

LGBT+ History: The Gay Christian Movement

The Gay Christian Movement was founded in April 1976 at a public meeting at the Sir John Cass School in the City of London, and later changed its name to the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement.

In 1976 the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement was founded at St Botolph’s and through the 1980s and 1990s St Botolph’s was a safe space for those who had been excluded from other churches because of their sexuality. Fortunately in the last decade other churches have become much more welcoming to LGBT people. The church continues to be a place where LGBT are welcomed as an integral part of our community. (source)

Needing a new home they moved to Oxford house, a Settlement project in Bethnal Green. After staying there for 25 years, they decided to leave London and relocated to a new home in Nottinghamshire.

Now the Movement includes LGBT+ and allies amongst its members, and also welcomes those of different faiths, or none, to work towards shared goals.

LGBT+ History: London Switchboard

1974  London Lesbian and Gay Switchboard, a London-based information and support helpline, is established in March.

Originally setup to support men coming out after the partial decriminalisation of male Homosexuality and signpost to the newly formed ‘gay scene’.  In the 1980’s the organisation extended its remit to try and educate people on the AIDs epidemic, which led to some of the volunteers going on to setup other organisations such as the Terrence Higgins Trust and The National Aids Manual.

In 2014, Queen Elizabeth II sent a message of congratulations on their 40th anniversary, the first time that the British Monarchy has acknowledged and supported the LGBT+ community so publicly.

Switchboard rebranded to its current name and logo in 2015, to recognise that its services are not limited to London, and to include people from all sexual orientations and gender identities.

Rainbow Writers Project – Creative Writing Workshops with Derbyshire LGBT+

Tying in with the #50years events this year, Derbyshire LGBT+ are pleased to announce the Rainbow Writers Project, a series of free creative writing workshops. The workshop lead will help participants explore creative writing through a series of fun exercises, suitable for all levels. There will be time to write, discuss and read out during each workshop. At the end of the project, we are offering participants the option to read their work out at a special celebration event at the end of October.

The workshops will be for our social support groups on the following dates:

4th May – Reach Out – 18+ men’s group
17th May – Outrageous – 18+ women’s group
8th June – Chesterfield Youth Group for 13-19’s
10th June – Derby Youth Group for 13-19’s
10th June – Stand Out – 19-30’s group
14th June – Omi Polari –50+ men’s group
28th June –workshop open to all LGBT+ people, please contact us to book a place.
11th July – Golden Rainbows Chesterfield – 55+ group
7th August – Transcend and SOFFA – 18+ Trans* group – TBC
A workshop for Blaise (18+ BAME group) TBC

An end of project event is planned provisionally for the end of October 2017. We hope that some of the workshop attendees would like to present their work as part of a celebration of the project.

If you identify as LGBT+, would like to attend a workshop and are either not part of a group or cannot make the date for your group, there will be an open workshop on Wednesday 28th June 6-8pm. Please get in touch with us mailto:info@derbyshirelgbt.org.ukif you would like to book a free place.

LGBT+ History: First British Gay Rights Conference

1973 The Campaign for Homosexual Equality held the first British Gay Rights conference in Morecambe, Lancashire.  Its second annual conference, held in 1974 in Malvern, “signalled a formal coalescence between the separate strands represented by GLF (Gay Liberation Front) and CHE (Campaign for Homosexual Equality), and CHE’s formal commitment to a policy of militant reformism.

Friend was set up in London in 1971 as a CHE taskforce intended to become CHE’s counselling arm, by the end of the year Friend had become a national befriending and counselling organisation.  As the London based organisation began to spread, the whole network was known as National Friend, with branches in most major cities in the UK.

Derbyshire LGBT+ originally started as Derby Friend back in 1983, as part of the National Friend network.